Mon, 27-Jun-2022
Tuesday 07 Jan 2020 , 7:30 am

Britain, France, and Germany to Convince Iran to Stick with the 2015 Nuclear Deal

As has been the case since President Donald Trump unilaterally withdrew the United States from the deal in 2018, Britain, France and Germany find themselves as mediators, trying to convince Iran to stick with the pact and the Americans that they are tough-minded allies who will not be deceived by Tehran.
By SIN Bureau
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Germany, Britain, and France are scrambling to keep talks with Iran over its 2015 nuclear agreement alive despite Tehran having all but torn up the deal after the United States killed its top military commander.

In its first formal response to the killing of Qassem Soleimani in a drone strike at Baghdad airport, Iran said on Sunday it would abandon limits on its enrichment of uranium, further breaching a central component of the deal it struck with six major powers.

Since Iran did not say how far it would take enrichment while reaffirming cooperation with U.N. inspectors monitoring its nuclear activity, European Union officials found positive elements in the statement and the potential for de-escalation.

At the same time, EU foreign ministers will hold an emergency meeting in Brussels on Friday to discuss ways to save the deal via pressure if necessary, a step that could lead to the reimposition of U.N. sanctions on Tehran.

As has been the case since President Donald Trump unilaterally withdrew the United States from the deal in 2018, Britain, France and Germany find themselves as mediators, trying to convince Iran to stick with the pact and the Americans that they are tough-minded allies who will not be deceived by Tehran.

In the wake of Soleimani’s killing, which came in response to stepped-up attacks on U.S. assets by Iranian-backed militias in Iraq, tensions in the region have risen to their highest level in more than a decade, making mediation more difficult.

Compounding the frustration on the European side is the fact they were given no advanced warning of Trump’s decision to kill Soleimani despite its potential to destabilise the region.

Also, already world shares were surging including the gold and crude prices. Because of the tensions between Iran, it has been seen that U.S. stock market collapsed as the investors are loosing the confidence to invest.

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Neha Mule

Neha writes articles on sectors including medicine, food, materials, and science & technology. A qualified statistician, she has the ability to observe and analyze the trends in global markets and write compelling articles that help CXOs in decision making. She is a bookworm and loves to read fiction, lifestyle, science and technology. Neha comes with 6 years of experience in content writing and editing that involves blog writing, preparation of study materials and OERs.

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